It is never too late to be what you might have been.

George Eliot

Coming to the end of your military career is daunting, no matter how long you have served. Thankfully the Military have put into place some great steps to help all service personnel through their resettlement period. The terms of this help depends on your length of service and I can only really speak from my own experience of having served (almost) 24-years.

The following are the first few bits of help that I have received and am grateful for so far. Some of these are provided by the military, but others I’ve sought out myself.

  1. Meeting with a Resettlement Officer
  2. Pension Society Membership
  3. Career Transition Partnership Website
  4. Career Transition Workshop & Careers Advisor
  5. LinkedIn Contacts

Meeting the Resettlement Officer

I didn’t have to make a move to start the resettlement process, it kicked in 2 years to the day. JPA asked me for contact details and the Resettlement Officer was in touch very quickly. When my Resettlement period began, we were a couple of weeks into the first COVID-19 lockdown out in Cyprus. I wasn’t put off, I’d been waiting for this time for a while now. Unfortunately I wasn’t able to meet her face to face, but we had a really helpful talk through the process and entitlements that I’d receive over the next 2 years.

This was really good to know – I hadn’t really taken much notice previously so was really grateful to have it all spelled out to me; leave I’d be entitled to above my individual leave allowance for courses and termination time to sort out my final move etc. I also discovered I was entitled for some money towards training and development for my next role.

I was still 2 years out at this point but found it really helpful to have an understanding of these things and appreciated not being left to figure it out for myself. It was explained at the end that I would need to register with the CTP and to expect a call from them in the future regarding attendance of a workshop.

Membership of the Forces Pension Society

The next thing I decided to do was look at the Pension Society. Again, it’s not something I had really concentrated on as I’d floated through my career, but now needed to have an understanding of what to expect. Especially with the McCloud Hearing and the potential disruption that could cause to projected figures etc. I’ve not had a lot to do with them so far, but as I get closer, I envisage I’ll be in touch with them to ensure that everything I receive is correct and ties together.

Career Transition Partnership Website

Upon receipt of the brief by the Resettlement Officer, I was given access to the CTP website and created my login. The site is really helpful I find that I check back regularly. There is access to industry specific information, jobs, training, workshops and events plus much more. There is also career assessment tools, which can help you to bring out your strengths and preferences. You can also utilise the CV builder within the site and much, much more.

Career Transition Workshop

This was a real eye opener for me and I’m so pleased I did it. It was a 3-day course with Amy Campbell from the CTP. We covered all parts of the CV and interview techniques as well as receiving a really helpful handbook and going over LinkedIn profiles. The most impactful part for me was identifying transferrable skills. After my meltdown a few months earlier about having no transferrable skills, I was really pleased to be able to come up with a number of ways my skills can be used in the outside world and boosted my confidence no end. Almost immediately after the course, I received a call from my new Careers Advisor Leigh Stobbs, who advised me about the ways in which he can help. The first thing to do was use the information from the CTW to create my first CV in over 20 years, which we could then bounce between ourselves and tailor it appropriately towards the civilian market – no mean feat!

LinkedIn Contacts

Again, this was not included in the ‘official’ offerings, but it becomes apparent very quickly that LinkedIn is a hugely important factor for any person looking to transition, grow their visibility and learn how to network. We went over the site during the CTW and were given a number of helpful hints to tailor your profile. Whilst I’d had a profile before, I never really used it properly as I didn’t need to, but now it was apparent that it would be an important part of whatever future path I take. Whilst searching around I came across a guy called John Stephenson and his company, the Forces Transition Group. After taking a look at their website and reading some of the articles and information posted I liked what I saw and decided to get in touch. John has since been a massive help by providing CV advice, webinars, links to others as well as general confidence building.

Other things to consider

The CTP website offers Housing briefs and Financial briefs for those who are interested – I’ve not attended any of these yet so I can’t really comment.

I’ll go more in depth into the things I’ve learnt from the CTW and from the FTG in a later post, but I’d definitely say that these are the first steps to take once you reach your resettlement window and that HM Forces have set up a good automatic system to ensure that nobody is left out of the process. At the end of the day, it’s always up to the individual whether they choose to act on the information afforded during these offerings, but I’ve found them invaluable for my confidence and self-belief (so far).